Opposite Earrings

Another PCA-inspired project this time — an earring pair with the stripes in one running in a direction opposite to the other.

Opposite embellished earrings

The course that inspired me is Embellished veneer cabochons by Debbie Crothers. Debbie teaches how to make cabochons by applying multiple veneers, created using various techniques, onto a surface. A key component in her veneers — silkscreens — is still elusive in my local market, so I decided to work without silkscreens. I made some new veneers, and also reused leftover ones from other projects. I also made some stud earrings to attach the dangles to. I love the studs too. ๐Ÿ™‚

I finally used some techniques that I’d been wanting to for a while —

I applied gold foil onto my clay. I rubbed the foil backing with my fingers, and the transfer was decent. Maybe it’ll be better with some quick waves of a heat gun? I’ll need to try that out sometime.

I also used liquid clay on the surface for some glossy shine! I have to consciously stop myself from abusing this technique. ๐Ÿ™‚

I had some plans to fill up the zigzagging line in the middle, but in the end, I decided to scrap them. I’m pretty happy with this pair.

Wire Weave Bangle

Time for a wire weaving project!

I made a wire-weave bangle last week, with a pearl bead duo forming the focal element.

Wire weave bangle

Wire weave bangle

Or it could be a wire-weave tiara, if you ask my favorite model, Penguin. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Wire weave tiara?

For this bangle, I used three 16-gauge base wires and a 24-gauge weaving wire, both in a gold color. (Yup, I still use the thick wires that I ordered a long time ago.) I cut the base wires just a tiny bit longer than the intended circumference of the finished bracelet, because I wanted to add some small focal element in the end to actually finish it.

I kept my weaving wire uncut, since I’m still not good at estimating the length of wire I might need. I’d thought of measuring the wire as I unwind more and more of it, but somewhere along the way, I lost track. (This is what happens if you watch movies while working on projects! ๐Ÿ™‚ )

I left a margin of about 2-3cm (1″) when I started to weave. The pattern is an uncomplicated one — loop twice around bottom two base wires, loop twice around top two, repeat. The weaving itself was fun, since I also had the aforementioned movie-watching to accompany it. When I reached the end, I left the same margin as the beginning. At each end, I curled the middle base wire into loops, and bent its companion wires around it. That was the difficult part — since these are 16-gauge wires, it’s pretty difficult to make minute adjustments with them, and it was impossible to not nick the wires.

I then gradually curved the entire strip into an open bangle. To close it, I strung two pearl beads onto a length of wire, added eye loops at both ends of the wire and attached it to the loops of the bracelet.

I’m pretty happy with this bangle. ๐Ÿ™‚ My next bangle will have a new weave, of course, but I’ll also make at least one more of this one, maybe with a different color of weaving wire, since both my sis and my mom like it!

A makeover

I had these two large beads with various etched amorphous patterns on them, which I’d set aside to make simple earrings — by which I mean just stringing a head-pin through each of them, making eye-loops at the top, and attaching findings. I set to work on the first one. Just when I finished making the eye-loop from the head-pin, the bead chipped. Gasp! ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

The chip was visible, but hadn’t damaged the bead itself much, so my sister and I thought I could use one of her metallic paints to completely re-coat both beads. (I am so glad she has loads of painterly stuff for her cardmaking!) So I used a gold paint, painted one side of each bead, let them dry, and painted the other side. After both beads were fully dry, I added a coating of mod podge to both of them in the same manner. Beads ready post-makeover and reporting for duty again! ๐Ÿ˜Ž

This time, I was more careful while working with the wire, and here are the resulting beauties!

Earrings from a makeover

Beaded ornament experiment

Beading is something I’ve been wanting to try for a while. I’ve done some bead crochet projects, of course, but constantly seeing cabochons with beaded finishing on my Pinterest screen has to have some effect, doesn’t it? ๐Ÿ˜‰

So before I go running to buy beading supplies, I thought I’ll first try it with the limited supplies I have. I used my collection of beads and some nylon wire for the test run.ย I started out with a cyclic symmetry of three and added a few rounds. Because nylon wire isn’t super-thin, I could only go into each bead about twice on average,ย so the project ended up kinda stunted. In the final round, I turned the three-way symmetry into a six-pronged ornament. This is how it looks —Beaded ornamentRecounting my experience, I think I’d like to try more sometime.

Long oval metal dangles

Long-oval metal dangles

Long-oval metal dangles

So I had a couple of long metal oval beads with me for a looong time now, which I’d wanted to turn into earrings. They would probably look good by themselves, but I wasn’t satisfied with just that, and decided to add some wire and beads to them.

Black wire was my preferred choice because of the contrast with the golden metal. I’d also planned to string some seed beads on the wire, and got to work testing how they look. After checking quite a few contrasting colors for seed beads and remaining unconvinced, I decided to go with the pink ones since they don’t stand out too much and overshadow the metal, but are still distinct from the golden and black colors around them.

Long-oval metal danglesOriginally, I’d wanted the wire to just run once diagonally across each oval, but found that it doesn’t really stay put, so I added the criss-crossing.

These earrings just look so different from my usual jewelry. Hurrah for experimenting!