Fantasy Scenery on Glass

Fantasy Scenery on Glass

Fantasy Scenery on Glass

Hmm, this was actually supposed to be a sea life vase, if I’d fully followed the PCA course taught by Marlene Brady. As I’ve come to discover, extensive sculpting is not really my favorite. And as I’ve known for the longest time, extensive repetition is not something that interests me either. Unfortunately, this project combines the two. I felt tired just watching all the repetitive sculpting that Marlene does πŸ˜› and decided to make a really sparse version of her vase, just to help me learn about working with translucent clay on glass.

Instead of a large vase, I used a little jar. Of course, the jar is not tinted like Marlene’s is, so I added ‘artistic tinting’ using runny streams of acrylic paints on the inside of the jar. It looked good, and I can tell you I was tempted to call it a day with just that. πŸ˜€ However, I moved on to the sculpting.

I don’t own a sea life mold, and don’t plan to buy one in the near future either, so I dropped the turtles and fish from my version. However, the rest of it is the repetitive bit, so I changed my scenery to a fantasy one, with flower-like and weed-like objects floating here and there, so that I don’t have to make too many of them. πŸ˜‰

Fantasy Scenery on Glass

I don’t own colored translucent clay either — I have some plain translucent clay, and it was still in its pack. I mixed small chunks of ‘regular’ Premo clay to color it. Good thing I’m of the ‘add-in-small-quantities’ type, because I learned that a tiny, tiny amount of colored clay is enough to tint the transparent one. (In my next coloring experiment, I’ll use tiny, tiny amounts of alcohol inks!)

So after a lot πŸ˜‰ of sculpting, I baked the piece, and as you can see, it looks great with light streaming through it! The clay sticks well to the glass, too, although I’ve not tried destructive things like peeling or scratching it away…

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Tiny flower earrings and pendant

My mom had received tiny glass bangles at a ceremony — they’re barely 2-3 cm (an inch) wide. They were obviously not made for wearing, but the uneven thickness of the glass made them look very artsy. With my newly developed interest in polymer clay, I had just the idea for using them in some jewelry.

In related news, I recently made my first cane with some leftover gray and pink clays from a (disastrous) project that I talked about previously. I didn’t have any particular design in mind, I just wanted to practice reducing the cane and seeing if the original pattern stays recognizable. The pattern did change, and I need a lot more practice to get to the stage that I see in tutorials, but this cane is obviously not wasted. (Is anything ever wasted in clay land?) I cut out slices from it for the jewelry I had in mind.

Remember, in my last post, I’d discovered that Sculpey III clay, which I’m using, turns out brittle when used for thin pieces? Well, I used that wisdom this time. If you’re thinking I made something thick, well, you’re in for a surprise. I went even thinner! πŸ˜€ What can I say? I trust my creative instincts, and it pays off sometimes. πŸ˜‰ I cut out slices from the cane, and stuck them to one another like independent-but-kinda-joined petals, and to the backs of three of the bangles. One of them would become a pendant, and I worked on that first to get a feel for this stuff. The other two would make earrings, and, feeling confident from my practicing with the pendant πŸ˜› I made them look mostly alike. (Phew!) I shaped all of them so they would bulge slightly outward.

Then came the baking. I placed tiny paper balls under the petals so they would retain their bulges. And I used my newly-made foil-lined paper box to protect the them from temperature fluctuations. I baked for about 10 mins tops because they’re so thin, and they turned out alright when I took them out of the oven, yay! Maybe I can stop feeling apprehensive about the possibility of burning things now.

I grabbed some jump rings and findings. (Looks like I don’t have blackish rings and findings anymore, and neither does the online store I usually shop at. Time to look around.) I carefully added jump rings to all three pieces, and then earring findings to two of them. Ta daa!!

Tiny flower pendant

Tiny flower pendant

Tiny flower earrings

Tiny flower earrings

Given the fragile nature of all the parts that make these jewelry pieces, I don’t know how long they’ll last. I did apply copious amounts of glue to the backs, and since earrings and pendants don’t undergo rough use, I’m keeping my fingers crossed. Not all my fingers, though. πŸ˜‰