Macramé owl

Macramé owl

There was this macramé ornament that I made, and I thought that I could hang it in my car, but it turned out to be a bit large for that. It’s also been a while since I made any jewelry stuff. So I decided to make another macramé owl that could turn out to better fit my car. I used the same little bit of scrap yarn that I used for that earlier owl, and almost the same beads — the green ones as earlier for the eyes, but a different, disc-shaped bead for the beak. I also followed mostly the same directions as I did earlier, deviating to cover up a couple of mistakes from simultaneous TV watching. 🙂 I probably should have stopped a row or two before I eventually did, because the owl looks slightly elongated… I still like it, though, and will see how it fits in my car. 🙂 I especially like that it looks kinda scatterbrained because of the yarn strands in the ‘horn’.

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Scrappy earrings

Scrappy because they are made of fabric scraps and look disorganized as well.

Scrappy earringsI tore out strips from unused brown/black fabric, and cut some pieces of leftover brown yarn from my old knitting projects. I made two hoops from silver-colored wire. I created each hoop this way — first, I made a loop about 1cm in diameter; then an eye loop from one end such that it circles around the other end; finally an eye loop from the other end just below the first eye loop. The second eye loop will turn out perpendicular to the first. (Wish I’d clicked photos of the steps, but it was a random experiment.) I made sure the second eye loop was large enough to fit in it a bunch of the fabric strips and yarn.

So you now know what the next step is. 🙂 I took a bunch of the strips and yarn and ran them through the second eye loop. I checked that both ‘arms’ of the bunch hanging from the eye loop were similar in length. I gathered both arms together, smoothed them out and made a knot (not too tight right now, though!) right where the second loop is. There, that hid both eye loops because of the thickness of the fabric bunch.

Before tightening the knot, I moved around the strips and yarn slightly so they look haphazard but not too much.

To finish the earrings, I added a finding to each hoop.

Stone pendant

I have this collection of medium-sized irregularly shaped stones that come with holes pre-drilled into them. They’re of varying shapes and sizes, and they’re a bit heavier than traditional jewelry ingredients (they’re stones, after all!) So earrings, necklaces or bracelets were out. Making pendants of them seemed like the thing to do.

But then, there are only so many ways in which irregular shapes can be turned into pendants. I’m not a fan of encasing them in nets, so that’s out. I decided to start out simple for now, and think more later. This is my attempt on one of the stones — this one’s shaped more regularly than the rest:

Stone pendant

The overall process is simple enough. I cut two lengths of wires. In each of them, I made a loop at around the center, and twisted the arms into spirals. (That’s four spirals overall.) I then inserted a headpin through a seed bead, a bead cap and the stone. The two spiral wires came next, followed by the topmost bead cap and a final seed bead. I then made an eye loop with the remaining length of the headpin. Tada!

Not bad, though the upper bead cap doesn’t sit very cozily due to the irregularity of the stone. It’s still good enough for casualwear.

Beaded partial necklace

My first attempt at bead crocheting resulted in a beautiful bracelet and some very painful fingers. 😦 I’d wanted to try my hand at Kumihimo instead, but I haven’t managed to buy a disc yet. While I’m thinking if I should make a DIY Kumihimo disc, I decided to give bead crocheting one more shot — this time, with cotton crochet thread instead of generic nylon wire.Partial beaded necklaceI tested out the pattern with a few color combinations before finalizing this one. The white seed beads are non-uniform and slightly larger than the others, which made me almost not use them, but it gives the piece a bit of a rustic and handmade look, so I decided to keep them after all. I like this look now. 🙂

The pattern is a 9-bead repeat of blue(3)-white(2)-brown(3)-white(1). It is broken in the middle by a 9-row single-color band of metallic silver seed beads. That makes it around 40 rows of the base pattern on each half, resulting in a partial necklace slightly longer than 16cm (about 6.5″).

To finish the piece — At each end, I used gold wire to make an eye loop that went through the visible crochet stitches and strung a bead cap through the remaining wire. I made another eye loop outside the bead cap to hold the cap in place. I then attached a large jump ring through the outer eye loop, through which I strung black rope to make the partial piece ‘complete’.

Tiny bead earrings and not-so-tiny charm

Tiny earrings and charmTiny earrings — they have their own kind of charm, don’t they? 🙂 I made these earrings using small head pins, and each of them has one seed bead, one brown-and-crimson glass bead and one faceted bead. Nothing special here, I just strung the beads onto the head pin, made an eye loop and snipped off the extra wire. For the findings, I used a limited set that I own; these findings are shorter than the ones I usually use.

Of course, I feel earrings without other matching adornments get kinda lonely, so I made a bracelet / pendant charm. I didn’t really like how it turned out when I used the same kind of beads I used for the earrings, so I changed things a little and used a large(r) faceted bead instead of the smaller ones — I added it as the center of the charm. Since the small faceted beads were not in the picture anymore, I added a couple more seed beads for length. I strung them all onto a wire, made eye loops at both ends, and bent the wire into a curve.

They look so happy together they’ve formed a smiley face. ;P

Flowery bracelet charm

Gosh has it been a long time since I made some jewelry! I’ve been looking for thicker gauge wire here in Bangalore / India, but my net is still empty, and I’m taking a break from the search now. Meanwhile, I’ve not tried to create more jewelry with the same old coils of wire I have — every idea that comes to me (both from within and without) is either followed by a ‘been there, done that’ reaction, or requires equipment that is difficult to procure here.

Not thinking about jewelry ideas and not creating pieces should free up some time, right? In theory, yes, but in reality, I don’t know where that time disappears, because my life seems busier than ever, although at the end of each day I can’t figure out what I really did that day. Like air rushing in to fill up vacuum, I guess mundane stuff has rushed in to fill up free time. I’ve been thinking of making some paper jewelry but not really getting to it; now is probably the time to shake off those cobwebs…

Speaking of ‘been there, done that’ — remember these flowery earrings I made a while back:
Flowery earringsI decided to make a companion piece to the earrings — a charm that I can attach to a bracelet. I made it the same way I made the earrings (click on the earrings for details on how), except I also added a second, independent eye loop at the opposite end.

Flowery bracelet charm

Flowery bracelet charm

I made the eye loop by first choosing the two beads between which I wanted that loop. 😛 I cut a small length of wire and passed it below the wire connecting the two beads. I wound one end of the wire around its other end to secure it, and shaped the other end into a loop. I then snipped off the extra lengths, of course. It was a bit more difficult than the other eye loop because there’s nothing to secure your wire while you work with it, but it’s not so difficult that one cannot manage it! 🙂

What do you think? Perfect match, or not really? Would you make it differently?

Moth earrings

These earrings are one of my early jewelry-making experiments. I made these from some wrapping paper (I think.) They have absolutely no varnish on them, and are suited only for dry days.

Moth earrings

Moth earrings

I cut around 16 elongated-heart shapes from the wrapping paper — 8 for each earring. (You could just fold the paper a lot of times and cut them together, just like you do for cutting decorative shapes in paper streamers.) I started sticking each side of every shape to a side of the next shape. Finally, just before I closed the earring by gluing sides of the eighth and first shapes together, I stuck a long wire which I’d shaped into an eye-loop at the top. I made sure I added copious amounts of glue to the wire so it would stick. 😉

That’s it. Oh yeah, don’t forget to add an earring finding to the eye loop! 🙂